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Spain's most delicious foodie hotspots

With its bustling and colorful markets, laid back bars and late night restaurants, Spain is the ideal destination for travelers who love to eat. Whether it’s churros for breakfast in Malaga or traditional Mallorcan tapas in Palma, these are the places to check out this summer.

Spain food

Malaga

While many arrive in Malaga and head straight to the beach, those in the know get set to eat their way around the city. Casa Aranda is the best place to start the day. This churros cafe started serving up these delicious breakfast treats in 1932 and remains a local favorite. Dip them in rich pouring chocolate while enjoying a strong coffee. Mercado Central de Atarazanas, a former shipyard before becoming a food market in 1870, is the ideal place to walk it off, checking out stalls of fresh produce before stopping off at one of its many bars for a drink, octopus skewer or some delicious local goat’s cheese. Be sure to leave room, as the surrounding cafes are excellent, especially El Colmenero bakery.

Alicante

It can be easy to dismiss Alicante for only catering to the tourist crowd. But it doesn’t take long to find authentic, traditional Spanish bars and restaurants serving classic dishes and some of the best wine in Europe. Cervecería Sento Rambla is top of the list. Chefs prepare the food in an open kitchen - you can order specific dishes or just ask the staff for recommendations. The patatas bravas and calamari are both superb, as is the extensive wine list. Grab a drink at the kiosk in Soho Parc before heading to Xeito in the marina. The croquettes here are amazing.

Palma

Mallorca’s famed beaches and excellent hiking trails make it a dream destination for outdoor lovers. But for foodies, the capital Palma has a wealth of amazing restaurants and tapas bars where you can easily while away a few days eating the best the island has to offer. Start off at San Juan Gastronomic Market, a striking modernist building that was once a slaughterhouse. Today it’s home to 17 brilliant food stalls, serving up oysters, tortillas and fideua, a paella-style dish made with noodles. El Camino, from the people behind Barrafina in London, serves up classic tapas as well as tiger milk ceviche, with seats laid out along its bar. The classic Bar Espana, with its bustling bar and excellent menu, is also worth checking out.

Fuerteventura

The second largest of the Canary Islands, Fuerteventura might seem more suited to a week spent kicking back at an all-inclusive resort rather than seeking out amazing restaurants. But the island has them in abundance. Casa Santa Maria, a historic hacienda in the village of Betancuria, is known for its local dishes,  especially braised kid. Make a night of it and stay at the adjacent guest house. Marabu, on the south coast, has an extensive cellar of Spanish wines and serves up freshly caught seafood and locally grown vegetables.

Tenerife

The northern town of Santa Ursula is blessed with some of Tenerife’s hottest restaurants, the perfect places to linger over a long meal after a day spent exploring the island’s spectacular coastline. El Calderito de la Abuela is the best, using ingredients grown in its own organic garden, as well as those supplied by local farmers. These go to make creative dishes including pan fried cheese with sweet chili sauce and marinated beef tomato with mackerel. The setting, overlooking the sea and La Orotava valley, make this an essential stop off on any trip to Tenerife.


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